WALT WHITMAN

28 February

A nice analysis of the poem «To a locomotive in Winter»

10 Fevereiro

An article on Leaves of Grass by a brasilian

UM CORPO SEM FIM:
A obra de Walt Whitman como corpo ilimitado, corpo em expansão, corpo fragmentário

AN ENDLESS BODY:
The work of Walt Whitman as an unlimited, expanding, fragmented body

«Podemos pensar a escrita de Whitman como uma coleção de fragmentos que, constantemente tocando-se, movem-se rumo a uma totalidade nunca alcançada; pois como aponta Deleuze (1997), enquanto a fragmentação é natural, o todo é o que deve ser buscado, alcançado e trabalhado pelo poeta. Tentemos ler a obra de Whitman como o fluxo de pessoas, ações e movimentos – fragmentos que apontam para uma estranha união.»

Let’s try to read Whitman’s poem as a flux of people, actions and movements – fragments that aim at a strange union.

«Na obra de Walt Whitman vemos uma vontade do todo, de tornar tudo parte de si e ser parte de tudo. Fora do que possa sugerir uma visão intelectualista que se dirija a uma alma totalizante, Whitman aponta para uma corporeidade única e imediata em que o corpo do poeta é também seu texto, o que é visto no – e através do – texto, e que almeja ainda tornar parte de si o leitor do texto, porém sem nivelar os fragmentos que se tornam parte desse corpo. O que podemos pensar desse corpo que se quer em expansão»

In Whitman’s poem we perceive the «self» as part of a bigger cosmos and soul.

«Na obra de Walt Whitman vemos uma vontade do todo, de tornar tudo parte de si e ser parte de tudo. Fora do que possa sugerir uma visão intelectualista que se dirija a uma alma totalizante, Whitman aponta para uma corporeidade única e imediata em que o corpo do poeta é também seu texto, o que é visto no – e através do – texto, e que almeja ainda tornar parte de si o leitor do texto, porém sem nivelar os fragmentos que se tornam parte desse corpo. O que podemos pensar desse corpo que se quer em expansão»

A sense of belonging to a broader entity. There’s a sense of vitality and vibrant togetherness.

«Whitman deseja tocar e identificar a linguagem com o mundo, evidenciar uma ligação profunda entre o mundo vivido e o texto, para isso indo às coisas, lembrando-nos o que diz Agamben (1999, p.29) ao tratar da “[i]déia da matéria”, que “[a]quele que […] toca a sua matéria, encontra facilmente as palavras para dizê-lo”. Podemos pensar assim o ir-às-coisas de Whitman como a única forma para dizê-las, em que, de maneira próxima porém diversa da poesia-coisa, ele deseja criar uma poesia-corpo, em que o caráter pulsante e vital do corpo é impresso sob as coisas que ele traz para si, como um vitalizar o mundo anônimo, outro ao eu.»

26 January

Whitman’s Song of the Broad-Axe (poem animation)

Comment on «Crossing Brooklyn Ferry»»:

The poem makes us wonder of industrial revolution times and the building of towns such as NY where Whitman lived. We can imagine the busy streets «crowds of men and women»…«ferryboats with hundreds that cross, returning home» and «everyone…part of the scheme», imagining that others will have the same experiences in the future «I am with you, you men and women of a generation, or ever so many generations hence». The poet observes what surrounds him people and nature, the links between him and others «The men and women I saw were all near to me»

Comment to Whitman’s poem «To a Stranger»:

Everyday we cross by people and though not knowing them we think about them, sometimes for brief moments… other times as we keep meeting them, day after day, in puclic transports that us to work, at the same hour, the same routine…we may feel we share something with them…we are all part of a certain context, a community of workers…

I suppose this poem talks about the connectedness that exist among people even if they are strangers…

TO A STRANGER

PASSING stranger! you do not know how longingly I look upon you,
You must be he I was seeking, or she I was seeking, (it comes to me, as of a
dream,)
I have somewhere surely lived a life of joy with you,
All is recall’d as we flit by each other, fluid, affectionate, chaste, matured,
You grew up with me, were a boy with me, or a girl with me, 5
I ate with you, and slept with you—your body has become not yours only, nor left
my body mine only,
You give me the pleasure of your eyes, face, flesh, as we pass—you take of my
beard, breast, hands, in return,
I am not to speak to you—I am to think of you when I sit alone, or wake at night
alone,
I am to wait—I do not doubt I am to meet you again,
I am to see to it that I do not lose you.

Song of Myself 

25 January

So many enrolments in a poetry online course (14.000?). Extensive introductions.

Long discussion threads. My favourite poets and poems… so many that it’s a difficult choice. Fernando Pessoa was named in one of my posts.

Some beautiful portuguese poems that were turned into popular songs:

Ser poeta, from Florbela Espança –

Queixa das almas jovens censuradas, de Natália Correia

Minha cabeça estremece, de Herberto Helder (dito pelo próprio)

The well known poem by José Régio «Cântico negro» recited by an old actor Villaret

Trova ao vento que passa, by Manuel Alegre the poet himself and the song by Adriano Coreia de Oliveira

From our spanish neighbours the beautiful poem of Rafael Alberti, sung by Paco Ibañez – A Galopar

And Pablo Neruda «Puedo escribir los versos más tristes esta noche»

A Construção of the brazilian Chico Buarque, amazing poem and music

16 January 2014

About poetry and featuring Billy Collins in this TED Talk about his fantastic animated poems and his amazing voice

22 December 2013

A MOOC on Poetry in America: Whitman, by EdX/Harvard will begin on the 15th January:

https://www.edx.org/course/harvardx/harvardx-ai12-2x-poetry-america-whitman-917

A module in a course that surveys 300+ years of poetry in America, from the Puritans to the avant-garde poets of this new century, the course covers individual figures (Poe, Whitman, Dickinson, Frost, Williams, Hughes), major poetic movements (Firesides, Modernist, New York, Confessional, L-A-N-G-U-A-G-E) and probes uses of poetry across changing times. Who, and what, are poems for? For poets? Readers? To give vent to the soul? To paint or sculpt with words? Alter consciousness? Raise cultural tone? Students will read, write about and also recite American poems.

Walt Whitman (1819-1892)

The Walt Whitman Archive – http://www.whitmanarchive.org/

Song of myself in http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/174745

Whitman’ voice – http://www.whitmanarchive.org/multimedia/America.mp3

A América do século XIX – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_lmkkpbnKFc

Conferência de Billy Collins sobre Walt Whitman

Saudação a Walt Whitman de Fernando Pessoa (1888-1935; poema de 1915) – http://arquivopessoa.net/textos/926

Fernando Pessoa em inglês:

http://www.poetryinternationalweb.net/pi/site/poet/item/7051

http://nescritas.com/tributefpessoa/

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s