Teaching Online

27 July

The course reached its end and I think it was relatively useful. Nothing new was presented or specially exciting. It served to review some issues related to online learning and to read a few more articles. Discussions were not particularly stimulating. I suppose that partcipants contexts are too much confined to traditional instruction, which doesn’t appeal to me.

 

26 July

Week 5 theme was about Presence, Engagement and Communication.

Some resources were suggested such as Creasman, P. (2012).  Considerations in Online Course Design.  The Idea Center. which generated some discussion.

In every week there were 2 fora of discussion: a thematic one and an open one.

This week I posted one comment on the thematic one trying to present an example of structured discussion in an online course, which I mixed with the production of an artifact.

In the Open discussion forum I have commented 2 of the articles/resources suggested for this week’s theme.

 

14 July

Week 4 addressed COURSE DESIGN.

Two years ago in OLDS MOOC (Open Learning Design Studio), I’ve collected in a wiki some information on Learning Design and Instructional Design.

In fact, Yishar Mor (one of the tutors)  presented a PREZI with several definitions, by different researchers, on the concepts of Curriculum Design, Learning Design, Instructional Design and Educational Design Research –http://prezi.com/b44jwdgvs8nl/olds-mooc-introduction/ 

The MOOC offered also design models created by the respective tutors and from other projects developed by UK Open University, gathered in Learning Design Grid .

Previously, I had been influenced by e-Learning Model of Prof. Marcel Lebrun (from Leuven University/Belgium), which still appeals to me for its simplicity and this is a lively talk about his model – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uqnT4jlJvhY

Most participants’ comments revolved around ADDIE and ARCS model, instructional models that were proposed in this week resources, but I would have focus on more recent models.

 

13 July

The 3rd week was about Technology Integration and many posts highlighted repositories of tools and experiences by participants. One of them shared a new repository of ICT tools – ICT MAGIC – http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/ 

ict_magic_repository

Beyond the topic discussions, weekly open discussions have taken place which have allowed to diverge to other personal interests, with dynamic contributions.

The tutors of the course delivered a wrap up video at the end of the week

Unit Objectives:

  • Use online tools to aid with meeting course outcomes, presenting material to appeal to various learning preferences, course design, and assessment of concepts.
  • Apply and discuss essential core components of course design standards for online learning.

Recommended readings and resources:

University of Central Florida: Applying the ADDIE Model

Keller, J. (2000).  How to integrate learner motivation planning into lesson planning: The ARCS model approach. Paper presented at VII Semanario, Santiago, Cuba

Online Learning Insights: How NOT to Design a MOOC

Bill Buxton: Interface design vs. Experience Design

Dieter Rams 10 Principles of Web Design

The ADDIE Model

Faculty Focus: 11 Strategies for Maintaining your Online Course

Quality Matters Rubric This site will require you to create a login to view the rubric.  At Kirkwood, we use the Quality Matters rubric to review courses and as a standard for online course design.  

Two years ago in OLDS MOOC (Open Learning Design Studio), I’ve collected in a wiki some information on Learning Design and Instructional Design.

In fact, Yishar Mor (one of the tutors)  presented a PREZI with several definitions, by different researchers, on the concepts of Curriculum Design, Learning Design, Instructional Design and Educational Design Research –http://prezi.com/b44jwdgvs8nl/olds-mooc-introduction/ 

The MOOC offered also design models created by the respective tutors and from other projects developed by UK Open University, gathered in Learning Design Grid .

Previously, I had been influenced by e-Learning Model of Prof. Marcel Lebrun (from Leuven University/Belgium), which still appeals to me for its simplicity and this is a lively talk about his model – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uqnT4jlJvhY

 

7th July

The 3rd week was about Technology Integration and many posts highlighted repositories of tools and experiences by participants. One of them shared a new repository of ICT tools – ICT MAGIC – <a title=”ICT Magic” href=”http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/&#8221; target=”_blank”>http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/ </a&gt;

<a href=”https://idabrandaomooc.files.wordpress.com/2014/07/ict_magic_repository.png”><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-1372″ src=”https://idabrandaomooc.files.wordpress.com/2014/07/ict_magic_repository.png?w=300&#8243; alt=”ict_magic_repository” width=”300″ height=”137″ /></a>

Beyond the topic discussions, weekly open discussions have taken place which have allowed to diverge to other personal interests, with dynamic contributions.

The tutors of the course delivered a wrap up video at the end of the week

29th June

Second week objectives: Develop course policies (tests, late work) that are manageable and fair.

Because the instructor is not immediately present in front of the class reminding students daily of deadlines, late work policies, and testing procedures, it is important to have clear and concise policies available for students in multiple locations throughout the course. Policies will vary by instructor and discipline. Some instructors feel that strict deadlines are essential to keep students on task, while others feel that flexibility better matches the purpose of the online format. Some instructors will require proctored exams, while others will choose to keep their exams accessible from home. Whatever policy choices you make for your course, they must be clear, concise, and the purpose repeatedly communicated to students in various formats. This week, we will discuss creating an online syllabus, and several ideas for testing, late work, and other course policies for online courses. 

Associated to a video posted for this week «The Purpose of Education» by Chomski, I re-watched the conference with H.Gardner Chomski and della Chiesa, a homage to Paulo Freire Pedagogy of the Oppressed and revisited the Freire Project on the critical pedagogy disseminated by Henry Giroux, Kincheloe, Tom Wilson and many others –

Seeing Through Paulo’s Glasses: Political Clarity, Courage and Humility from Giuliana Cucinelli on Vimeo.

 

28th June

The first week of the course was devoted to discussions on a faculty self assessment questionnaire to reflect on strengths and weaknesses experienced in teaching online:

«The self assessment from Pennsylvania State University (linked below) will help you assess your readiness for online teaching, and provides insights into expectations inherent in online course facilitation.  Click here to access the assessmentBased on your results, discuss your online teaching strength areas, and ask for guidance in areas that appear to need improvement. Share your thoughts about any questions on the assessment that surprised you or gave you a perspective you hadn’t previously considered.»

and on another line of discussion on «adapting your course» focusing on an academic article:

«After reading Brinhaupt (Week 1 Readings And Resources), share strategies you have used in online courses or would like to try in order to foster student engagement, stimulate intellectual development and build rapport with students. (If you are currently a student, share strategies instructors have used with you that you have found particularly effective)»

The amount of posting made it difficult to read all, but I’ve posted a few comments.

 

25th June

<p>I’ve just enrolled in a new MOOC promoted by Canvas which starts on 23rd June and extends through August.</p><p><a title=”MOOC” href=”https://www.canvas.net/courses/teaching-online-reflections-on-practice-1&#8243; target=”_blank”>https://www.canvas.net/courses/teaching-online-reflections-on-practice-1</a></p><h3 class=”emboss-light”>Full course description</h3><p>Designing and facilitating online courses with a diverse student population is a challenge for new, as well as experienced online instructors. This course invites your critical reflection on the methods of online instruction; beliefs and potential bias of the online learner; policies and rules and how they align with course objectives; tone and the purpose of communication. We’ve collected readings and experiences of practice from online instructors and students to provide a foundation for discussion. The decisions they have made will help us make similar or, upon reflection, different choices for ourselves and our students.</p><p>Those new to online instruction will benefit from the practical knowledge shared in this course. Experienced online instructors and designers will both expand their exposure to new insights and focus on the details of their own practice. The unique community college perspective, with all its diversity, provides a rich backdrop and adds genuine complexity to the discussion.</p><p>Resource materials will be primarily open Web readings and videos. Participants will be asked to collaborate, share reflections, and provide guided feedback to other participants.</p><p> </p>

 

23rd June 2014

New MOOC on Teaching Online promoted by Canvas Net.

Full course description:

Designing and facilitating online courses with a diverse student population is a challenge for new, as well as experienced online instructors. This course invites your critical reflection on the methods of online instruction; beliefs and potential bias of the online learner; policies and rules and how they align with course objectives; tone and the purpose of communication. We’ve collected readings and experiences of practice from online instructors and students to provide a foundation for discussion. The decisions they have made will help us make similar or, upon reflection, different choices for ourselves and our students. Those new to online instruction will benefit from the practical knowledge shared in this course. Experienced online instructors and designers will both expand their exposure to new insights and focus on the details of their own practice. The unique community college perspective, with all its diversity, provides a rich backdrop and adds genuine complexity to the discussion. Resource materials will be primarily open Web readings and videos. Participants will be asked to collaborate, share reflections, and provide guided feedback to other participants.

I’ve started today looking at the course syllabus:

  • Week 1 – Online Learners
  • Week 2 – Developing effective course policies
  • Week 3 – Technology and tool integration
  • Week 4 – Course design for online learning
  • Week 5 – Presence, engagement and online communication

and downloading the first articles:

Ally, M. (2004). Foundations of Educational Theory for online learning. In C. Anderson & F. Elloumi (Eds). Theory and Practice of Online Learning (2nd Ed, pp 3-32). Athabasca, AB, CA: Athabasca University Press.

Aslanian, C. B., & Clinefelter, D. L. (2012). Online college students 2012: Comprehensive data on demands and preferences. Louisville, KY: The Learning House, Inc.

Brinthaupt (2011). What the best online teachers should do. JOLT, 7, 515-524.

Infographic – Learning theories for online courses (Edudemic)

Online Learning Theory and Design (University of Wisconsin

I had previously included this Infographic on Learning Theories in my Pinterest

Learning Theories

A self-assessment reflection was required and I have filled a questionnaire, which returned an immediate feedback. Several lines of discussion were opened starting with a reflection on this self assessment, where I have posted:

«My experience with online training has been rather informal and the grading issues have been absent. My concerns are with authentic assessment, contextualized learning, evidences shown by works and reflections collected in e-portfolios. Assessment methods I follow have been essencially formative, exploring resources and producing artifacts, reflexions on readings and video watching, interaction with peers, peer- and self assessment and final reflections on the learning process. My experience with LMS has been with Moodle (as a tutor) and with many other platforms as a participant (Blackboard, etc). My latest experience as a facilitator in a MOOC was in a completely open environment, the main virtual space based on Blogger, using google tools and social media. I think it was a successful experience, considering the final reflections of participants and replies to the evaluation questionnaire. As in most MOOCs the rate of certification was about 10%. However, I think that people who enroll in MOOCs are not particularly driven by certification, rather by the interaction and  deeper learning about the themes addressed. At least, as a participant, this is my main motivation, to explore deeper or to initiate myself in less familiar knowledge fields. What I find most challenging in a MOOC is to provide feedback on a personal basis, when you have hundreds/thousands participants. Even if only a small percentage interact and the rest remain lurkers, it’s always a big number to manage and it’s practically impossible to give feedback for each artifact presented by each participant. To provide feedback through general and periodic messages or a helpdesk/FAQ is  the only way, but some participants (newcomers to online courses) lack this person-to-person dialogue and usually complain about feeling lost and not knowing if what they have submitted is satisfactory.»

A second line of discussion on Adapting your Course, aims at reading Brinhaupt (Week 1 Readings And Resources), and  share strategies used in online courses or try in order to foster student engagement, stimulate intellectual development and build rapport with students. (If you are currently a student, share strategies instructors have used with you that you have found particularly effective).

My reflection:

«Regarding Learning Strategies I’m particularly interested in Universal Design for Learning approach, because I deal with special needs concerns and inclusive frameworks. So I’m influenced by CAST/UDL guidelines:

UDL_guidelines

Considering the diversity of the learners and respective needs one must think in multiple perspectives, preparing resources in multiple formats and multiple media, giving alternative ways for learners to express themselves and promoting engagemnet, either by individual or group work, developing peer- and self-assessment. The recent movement of MOOCs has also influenced me, namely the connectivist approach: the focus on discussions in the community, interaction with abundance of information sources and peers, great flexibility, use of multiple platforms and nodes.

The article What the Best Online Teachers Should Do sums up in the following table some recommendations:

Bain_behaviours_in_online_teaching

Recently I’ve read an article of Grainne Conole in her blog e4innovation, with tips for designing MOOCs and useful teaching strategies – http://e4innovation.com/?p=800

Last year I participated  in another interesting MOOC promoted by  U.K. Open University which provided interesting strategies and tools to design online learning – http://www.olds.ac.uk/

URL course: https://www.canvas.net/courses/teaching-online-reflections-on-practice-1

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